Home

Like Shoot to Thrill - An AC/DC Tribute on Facebook!

An authentic tribute of AC/DC that covers the best of the Bon Scott era and the best of Brian Johnson's material

Who's Online?

We have 951 guests online

Atom RSS

feed-image Feed Entries
The Biz of Baseball :: Business of Sports Network
Minor League Baseball Sees Over 41 Million Fans, Continues Streak for Nearly Decade PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 34
PoorBest 
Latest MiLB News
Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 17 September 2013 14:41

Minor League Baseball

Minor League Baseball announced today that its regular season attendance surpassed 41 million fans again this season, as it has done so for nearly a decade. The 41,553,781 fans that MiLB attracted in 2013 is nearly 275,000 more than last year’s total. The industry also saw almost a 2% rise n average attendance, despite facing a multitude of weather issues early in the season.

“To experience increases in total and average attendance is a testament to the quality of our product and the ability of our clubs to adapt to conditions, be it weather, economic or otherwise,” Minor League Baseball President & CEO Pat O’Conner said. “Attracting more than 41 million fans a year for nine years has helped solidify the Minor League Baseball brand to our partners and fans.”

The Triple-A Indianapolis Indians (637,579) led all clubs in total attendance. The Columbus Clippers, their International League West Division rival, topped all domestic clubs in average crowd (9,212).

The Frisco RoughRiders paced all 30 Double-A clubs in total (479,873) and average attendance (7,057), for the ninth consecutive year.

The Dayton Dragons, as they have every season since they began playing in 2000, were tops among the 60

Class A clubs in overall attendance (579,946) and average (8,405). The Dragons also extended their record consecutive sellout streak for a professional sports team to 983 games.

The Brooklyn Cyclones, who attracted 232,224 fans for an average of 6,276, have led the 40 Short Season-A and Rookie clubs in both categories since their first year in 2001.

The Monterrey Sultans of the Mexican League led all MiLB clubs in average crowd (11,145) this season for the second straight year.

2013 Attendance by League

International League

6,766,442

Florida State League

1,212,184

Pacific Coast League

6,763,683

Midwest League

4,118,049

Mexican League

3,812,376

South Atlantic League

2,951,813

Eastern League

3,743,582

New York-Penn League

1,602,725

Southern League

2,316,591

Northwest League

984,432

Texas League

2,815,133

Appalachian League

275,419

California League

1,583,488

Pioneer League

673,124

Carolina League

1,934,740

Minor League Baseball

41,553,781

Source: Minor League Baseball


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He writes for Baseball Prospectus and is a contributor to Forbes. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted here.

Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

Follow The Biz of Baseball on TwitterTwitter

 
In Effort to Save The Biz of Baseball, Crowd Funding Campaign Started PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 30
PoorBest 
Business of Sports Network News
Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 18 September 2013 09:53

Business of Sports Network

Important message….

Dear valued sports business member,

For nearly a decade, those of us at the Business of Sports Network have strived to bring you not only news and opinion around sports business, but data not found anywhere else. From college students working on papers, to media outlets both big and small, information provided across “The Biz of….” sites has been provided free of cost, something few media outlets provide.

As advertisement models have shifted, revenues have declined. While we retain the domain names, we have had to archive The Biz of Basketball, The Biz of Football, and soon, The Biz of Hockey.

Now, our most popular site, The Biz of Baseball, is in danger of the same fate. While overtures of venture capital and other investment has been discussed, to date they have fallen through.

In an effort to not only save The Biz of Baseball, but also create a single portal that would allow all aspects of sports business to be covered, we are reaching out to the community through an Indiegogo investment campaign. Our target is $6,000. When accounting for commission from Indiegogo, if the campaign runs to its goal, a total of $5,400 will be garnered to allow porting of all data across the various Biz sites into one repository, a new hosting service and redesign.

In addition, to grow content we will embark on a large contributor network which will allow us to cover everything from soccer on an international scale, to all facets of motor racing, the PGA, and beyond. If it’s sports outside the lines, we’ll be covering it.

We understand that not everyone can make a donation. What we do hope is that everyone that reads this will take the time to pass this link below on whether by email, or social media.

We can’t thank you enough for using our sites as often as you have. We hope that can not only continue, but flourish.

To donate, please visit:

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/business-of-sports-network/x/4785065

Warmest regards,
Maury Brown
President
Business of Sports Network
Bizball LLC


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He writes for Baseball Prospectus and is a contributor to Forbes. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted here.

Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

Follow The Biz of Baseball on TwitterTwitter

 
Miami Marlins Selling Tickets to No-Hitter the Day After It Happened PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 57
PoorBest 
Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Monday, 30 September 2013 14:08

Jeffrey Loria

Touting it as a “way to have a piece of history” the Miami Marlins are selling $15 tickets to yesterday’s no-hitter by Henderson Alvarez. The tickets will be on sale for not only Monday, but until Sunday, October 6th at midnight. The club is selling the 9,100 unsold tickets left for the game. The official box score for the game was 28,315, but the Marlins appear to be back-dooring in extra numbers and revenues with the tickets being sold after the fact. The Marlins did not sell out one game this season.

The Marlins finished second to last in league attendance this year with an average of 19,584 but will be trying to nudge that up as any tickets sold—even the ones for the no-hitter sold after the season is now completed —will count as paid attendance. In doing so, the Marlins are artificially inflating their attendance. The club currently will end the season with the worst attendance decline in the second season of a brand new ballpark since 1992 when Bud Selig took over as commissioner.

This isn’t the first time the Marlins have artificially inflated their attendance numbers. The club sold tickets after Roy Holladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched a perfect game in 2010 that was played in Florida.


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He writes for Baseball Prospectus and is a contributor to Forbes. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted here.

Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

Follow The Biz of Baseball on TwitterTwitter

 
KOBRITZ: There's No Celebrating in Baseball PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 9
PoorBest 
Jordan Kobritz Article Archive
Written by Jordan Kobritz   
Monday, 23 September 2013 15:31

“We gonna celebrate and have a good time.”
Celebration, Kool and the Gang 1980

“There’s no crying in baseball.” That line, uttered by Tom Hanks as manager Jimmy Dugan in the 1992 movie A League of Their Own, a tribute to the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, is rated 54th on the American Film Institute’s list of the greatest film quotes of all time. As we’ve learned in the past week, along with no crying in baseball you can add “no celebrating” to the list of prohibitions.

With the highest payroll in MLB, the Dodgers were in last place in their division on June 21 with a record of 30-42, 9 ½ games behind the first place Arizona Diamondbacks. Shortly thereafter the team caught fire, going 58-23, a streak of historic proportions. When the team clinched the National League West crown on September 19, the players understandably wanted to celebrate.

But as luck would have it, the Dodgers were denied an opportunity to celebrate with their hometown fans, finishing off their worst-to-first run on the road against the D’backs. After a brief celebration on the field, the Dodgers retired to their clubhouse to drench each other in champagne. When most of the fans at Chase Field had left the ballpark, about half the team emerged from the clubhouse - dressed in their championship t-shirts - and made a beeline for the swimming pool in right center field for an impromptu pool party.

The supposed slight infuriated most of the D’backs’ players and front office staff. Arizona CEO Derrick Hall, a former Dodgers’ executive, said in a statement, “I would call it disrespectful and classless…” D’backs’ infielder Willie Bloomquist chimed in, “It’s surprising, because they have a lot of veteran guys on that team that I thought were classier than that.”

Even Arizona Senator John McCain, a rabid Diamondback’s fan, got into the act, tweeting “No-class act by a bunch of overpaid, immature, arrogant spoiled brats!” If McCain hadn’t referenced the Dodgers, one might have thought he was referring to his fellow Senators.

Poolgate wasn’t the only celebratory antics of the past week that generated umbrage. After Miami Marlins’ rookie pitcher Jose Fernandez hit his first Major League home run against the Atlanta Braves, he momentarily stood at home plate admiring the blast while it sailed out of the ballpark. Braves’ players thought Fernandez was being disrespectful to their pitcher, Mike Minor. After he crossed home plate, Fernandez was confronted by Braves’ catcher Brian McCann who proceeded to lecture him on baseball etiquette. Both benches emptied, but after some pushing and shoving the game resumed without further incident.

After a post-game lecture from his manager, Mike Redmond, Fernandez made his way to the Braves’ locker room and apologized to the entire team. “I feel embarrassed,” said Fernandez. “…this isn’t high school. This is a professional game. I made a mistake.” But did he? Fernandez is a 21-year-old rookie having a season for the ages. He hit the home run in his last start of the year after reaching the 170-inning limit set by the Marlins. He finished with a 12-6 record and an ERA of 2.19 for the worst team in the National League, stats that should win him Rookie of the Year honors. Why shouldn’t he be celebrating?

I get it. The “unwritten rules” of baseball, which can be interpreted in as many different ways as there are big league players, say you shouldn’t show up the other team. But can we please lighten up? Where does it say players can’t have fun? Braves’ manager Fredi Gonzalez, as classy an act as you’ll find in the game, said of Fernandez, “…he likes to have fun…” Isn’t that what playing sports is all about, at any level and at any age? Sure, professional players get paid, but should money take the fun out of the game?

If the D’backs didn’t like the fact the Dodgers celebrated in their pool, they should have won the game. Better yet, they shouldn’t have blown that 9 ½ game lead they held on June 21. If the Braves are upset at other players celebrating their achievements, their response should be to celebrate their own accomplishments. Kool and the Gang got it right. Let’s not take the good times out of baseball.

 


Jordan KobritzJordan Kobritz is a former attorney, CPA, and Minor League Baseball team owner. He is a Professor and Chair of the Sport Management Department at SUNY Cortland and is a contributing author to the Business of Sports Network and maintains the blog: http://sportsbeyondthelines.com. He looks forward to your comments and can be contracted, here.

 
Read the Horowitz Decision on Alex Rodriguez 162 Game Suspension PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 239
PoorBest 
MLB News
Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 14 January 2014 14:17

Click to read the Horowitz decision on Alex Rodriguez

The Biz of Baseball has been updated with a new document

With arbitrator Fredric Horowitz rendering a decision that Alex Rodriguez will receive a 162 game suspension that covers all of the 2014 regular season and postseason, MLB has doled out the largest suspension in the history of the game. Based upon the Joint Drug Agreement between MLB and the MLBPA, the actual decision is to remain confidential. However, Alex Rodriguez filed suit against MLB and the MLBPA to get the suspension overturned. As part of that lawsuit, the decision was attached.

Here is the Horowtiz decision, added to the Biz of Baseball document collection under “PEDs”

See the decision in PDF


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He writes for Baseball Prospectus and is a contributor to Forbes. He is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted here.

Follow Maury Brown on Twitter Twitter

Follow The Biz of Baseball on TwitterTwitter

 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 7 of 1074
 
Banner

Poll

Should MLB Force Jeffery Loria to Sell the Marlins?
 


Joomla extensions by Siteground Hosting