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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Yankees to Offer 25-Cent Seats for Two Exhibition Games PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 23 December 2008 15:45

New Yankee Stadium

Rendering of the Grand Hall entrance to new Yankee Stadium
(See more renderings here)

1923 prices are returning to New York, albeit only for two exhibition games at the new Yankee Stadium.

Bleacher seats for games against the Chicago Cubs on April 3-4 will be priced at 25¢, and Grandstand tickets will be priced at $1.10-the same prices they were on April 18, 1923, the day the original Yankee Stadium opened. Tickets on the Terrace Level will cost between $20-35, tickets on the Main Level will be $20-45, and tickets on the Field Level will range from $45-$50.

Remaining tickets, subject to availability, will go on sale to the general public at a date to be determined in the future.

"To express our gratitude toward our full-season ticket licensees, we are offering tickets for these two exhibition games at no cost to them," said Yankees Chief Operating Officer Lonn Trost. "The balance of tickets will be sold first to our partial-plan holders, then to the general public, at vastly reduced rates compared to the regular season. Using such a pricing model for these games allows us to thank our fans for their continued loyalty and introduce them to Baseball's new grand cathedral."

Tickets for the regular season at new Yankee Stadium will set a benchmark for some of the most expensive in U.S. sports history with the highest priced seats in the Legends section going for up $2,500 a game.

Source: New York Yankees


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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Despite Recession, Red Sox Set Regular Season Ticket Sales Record For First Weekend PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 17 December 2008 14:32

Red SoxThe Boston Red Sox set a new club record for the first weekend of regular season ticket sales with 243,024 tickets purchased by fans over the two-day period.  Sales started at 10 a.m. on Saturday, December 13, coinciding with the traditional Red Sox ticket sales launch event, Christmas at Fenway presented by Stop and Shop.  Red Sox EVP/Chief Sales and Marketing Officer Sam Kennedy made the announcement.

“This year, given the current economic conditions, we are particularly gratified by the extraordinary dedication our fans have shown the organization,” said Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner.  “We are humbled by their loyalty and support.”

The total sold surpasses the first weekend record total of 234,033 set last year for the 2008 season.  Tickets were purchased online, by phone, and at Fenway Park, and included Sox Pax and single games for select dates in April, May, and September.

The Boston Red Sox also sold over 31,000 tickets for their 2009 spring training games on the first weekend of sales, which took place on December 6 and 7.  The number of tickets sold during the first two days of sales exceeded 30,000 for only the second time since the current ownership took over in 2002.  A total of 31,553 tickets were sold for games at City of Palms Park in Fort Myers, Florida. That total includes tickets sold over the internet, by phone, and at the City of Palms Park ticket office.

Tickets for 2009 Spring Training and the 2009 regular season remain at the 2008 prices, part of Red Sox ownership’s price freeze for all 2009 tickets.

Source: Boston Red Sox


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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Reds Freeze Ticket Prices Based On Poor Season PDF Print E-mail
Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Saturday, 06 December 2008 11:26

Cincinnati RedsThe Cincinnati Reds froze ticket prices on Friday, but the decline in the economy wasn’t the overriding factor in the decision, their poor play on the field, was. As reported by The AP, executives at the highest level made the decision after the Reds eighth consecutive losing season.

Reds chief executive Bob Castellini felt strongly that ticket costs shouldn't go up even one dollar given the way the team played, spokeswoman Karen Forgus said.

The last time the Reds held the line on prices was 2005. The Reds' average ticket price for 2008 was $19.41, according to an annual survey from the Team Marketing Report. The major league average was $25.43.

Forgus said the only exception to the price freeze will affect about 100 season-ticket holders with three- and six-year deals that are expiring. She said they'll be paying 5 to 10 percent more.

Many clubs are freezing prices, or setting the majority of the house lower including the A’s, Pirates, Astros, and the Red Sox, who haven’t froze prices across the board in 14 years.


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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$90 for Spring Training Tickets? Welcome to the New Dodgertown PDF Print E-mail
Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Friday, 14 November 2008 22:59
Dodgers Glendale Complex

Dodgertown, West? Select the image above
to see in a larger view.

With the Dodgers leaving Vero Beach, Florida after 61 years, and heading to a bew $100 million facility in Glendale, Arizona, spring training for the Dodgers will cost as much as $90 for nearly 700 seats in the new facility.

(select the image to the left, or select this link to see more images and information on the new Glendale spring training facility for the Dodgers)

By comparison, the highest-priced tickets at Dodgertown in Vero Beach last season were $20. As reported by The AP, the Dodgers are touting amenities as part of the value-added with cost.

[Dodgers COO Dennis] Mannion said the $90 price includes free parking in the VIP section, which normally costs $10; a $20 coupon that can be used for food, beverages and merchandise; a different premium item such as a floppy hat or baseball hat at no charge, and complimentary water and sunscreen along with those fancy towels.

The Dodgers are charging $30, $26 and $24 for everything else between the bases, and $18 for reserved seats otherwise.

For those that are being hit by the downturn in the economy, 3,000 spots on the lawn outside the outfield fence for $8.

According to The AP, the top spring training prices last year were for the Boston Red Sox at $46 per seat behind homeplate. The lowest price for the best spring training seats were for the Reds and White Sox at $16.

The first home spring training game for the Dodgers is scheduled for March 1 against Brewers.


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
Red Sox Freeze Ticket Prices for First Time in 14 Years PDF Print E-mail
Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:18
Red Sox

If you don’t think the economy isn’t being watched by MLB clubs, take this news as a sure sign that they are.

The Boston Red Sox today announced the team is holding prices at 2008 levels for all existing seats and standing room tickets available to the public at Fenway Park for the 2009 season.  The team will also hold prices for all tickets available to the public for 2009 Spring Training games at City of Palms Park in Ft. Myers, FL.

“We have been listening to fans, friends, and family about the challenges they are facing in light of the current adverse economic conditions,” said Larry Lucchino, Red Sox President/CEO.  “We are also grateful for the unwavering faith and support our fans have shown us year after year and we hope our ownership’s decision to hold prices for the upcoming season will in some way help ease the burden on Red Sox Nation.”

The move marks the first time in 14 years, since 1995, that the team has held ticket prices across the board.  Ticket prices have been held in several categories in recent years, including 70% that remained the same in 2006 and 81.5% in 2007.

“John Henry, Tom Werner, and our ownership always try to look at our business through the prism of the Red Sox fans who have stepped up to higher prices each year for several years,” said Lucchino.  “We are taking this step to arrest the growth of season ticket and individual game ticket prices to ensure the great and distinctive Fenway Park experience is a viable option in 2009 for as many citizens of Red Sox Nation as possible.”   

(In addition to maintaining 2008 ticket price levels on all existing seats and standing room ticket areas, the Red Sox special discount programs for Active Duty Military and Clergy will continue in 2009.  Premium seat contractual ticketholders are also being given the option to freeze their tickets at 2008 prices for 2009.  For those choosing to stay at the same 2008 price level, contractual agreements would be extended for one additional season.)

Source: Boston Red Sox


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
Cardinals to Raise Season Ticket Prices in '09 PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 22 October 2008 07:56

CardinalsThe St. Louis Cardinals have announced an increase in season ticket prices for the 2009 season, albeit not across the board. The increase coincides with Major League Baseball's 80th All-Star Game on Tuesday, July 14, at Busch Stadium.

The Cardinals will see a 1.6 percent increase, based on a weighted average for 2009, according to notifications sent to season ticket holders.

"We are committed to using the same general pricing structure as in 2008, with only a few changes that reflect the dynamic nature of our seating mix," said Cardinals' President Bill DeWitt III. "We are being very sensitive to the trends in the general economy while also being faithful to our longtime season ticket holders. Our fans have many entertainment options, and we feel that Cardinals baseball continues to represent great value for individuals, families, and corporations.”

The Cardinals will require their season ticket holders to remit a $100 per seat deposit by the end of October to secure their seats. The balance of their accounts will be due in February.

Source: St. Louis Cardinals


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
Will Owners Heed Selig’s Warning on Ticket Prices? PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Monday, 06 October 2008 14:11
MLB and the Recession

 

Just before Game 3 of the NLDS between the Phillies and Brewers, MLB Commissioner Bud Selig warned owners not to “get too cocky” when it comes to the escalating prices for tickets next season.

“Because you do pay a price,” Selig said.

MLB enjoyed the second highest paid attendance figure in history this year, along with record breaking revenues, but the financial crisis that has rocked Wall Street is something that could hit the league harder next year.

“I think anybody in every business is concerned,” Selig said.

The comments coming in Milwaukee, MLB’s smallest market, where the Brewers saw their postseason run end on Sunday, were appropriate. The Brewers popularity is high, and with that it would be tempting for their owner Mark Attanasio to raise ticket prices.

Baseball markets like Milwaukee, Cleveland, and Tampa/St. Petersburg are different than Boston or New York. In other words, don’t think that just because Selig warned the owners on ticket prices, every club will heed his warning, or need to do so.

As an example, according to the Fan Cost Index put out by Team Marketing Report, the Red Sox increased the average ticket price at Fenway Park by 10.1 percent this season to $48.80. That comes on the heels of an increase of 2.7 percent the year prior, 4.3 percent in 2006, 9.3 percent in 2005, and 5.7 percent in 2004.

By comparison, in their final year in Yankee Stadium, the Yankees raised average prices by 18.1 percent for 2008, 2.6 percent in 2007, 3.4 percent in 2006, and no change in 2006 or 2005.

Teams with strong brand recognition at the local and national levels, such as the aforementioned Red Sox and Yankees, as well as the Cubs, Dodgers, and possibly even the Cardinals, may not need to heed Selig’s words as closely as, say, the Royals and Athletics.

The Royals had one of the largest increases in average ticket price for 2008, opening the season with a 21.1 percent increase from 2007, and the A’s posting an increase of 22.3 percent. So, when the Athletics say that they’re keeping prices for 2009 the same as they did in 2008, it may be less of a response to the national economic climate and more a case of them overshooting their projections coming into 2008.

The team that will need to be especially careful will be the Tampa Bay Rays. Attendance for the regular season has been up (largest increase for the 30 clubs at over 28 percent. However, that only moved them from being ranked 29th in total attendance to 26th this season), and ALDS games at the Trop have been sold out. Ticket prices for next season have not yet been announced, but the urge to increase prices will certainly be there for the Rays since their on-field success is likely to lead to greater demand for season tickets and individual game ticket purchases.

To put the prices for Rays tickets in perspective, they did not raise the average ticket price last season, in 2007 they raised the average ticket price 0.8 percent, in 2006 it was 24.7 percent (the year the latest CBA was reached), in 2005 they lowered the average ticket price by 5.2 percent, and in 2004 they raised the average price by 15.2 percent (this being the last year that the Rays were above the league average for ticket prices).

In reality, Selig’s comments really are targeting all clubs. The reason? All but two clubs (the Rays and Pirates) raised their average ticket price last season. Compare that to 2007 when five clubs (Nationals, Diamondbacks, Marlins, Reds, and Orioles) lowered prices.

Most analysts watching the U.S. economy believe that even with the $700 billion bailout by the Federal government, it will be years, not months, before the infusion takes hold. Selig, as Commissioner, is wise to warn the owners to mind how much, if at all, they raise ticket prices. Come April, it will be interesting to see who has adjusted to try and lure fans through the turnstiles while the economy continues to fluctuate.


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
Playoff Tickets on Secondary Market Running as High as $3,000 PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 22:54
MLB PostseasonWith MLB enjoying the attention of the one-game playoff between the White Sox and Twins for the AL Central crown, and the first day of the Division Series in the books, tickets are exceptionally difficult for fans to get if they haven’t already got them. Secondary ticket company RazorGator reports that, on average, the price for a playoff game is running $248 through their online system. Tickets to the Chicago Cubs-Los Angeles Dodgers series lead the way at an average of $367 per ticket.

Bargain hunting? RazorGator reports that tickets for the Rays series at Tropicana Field are the lowest average price at $146.

Tickets to the Philadelphia Phillies-Milwaukee Brewers series are averaging $266 per ticket while seats to see the Los Angeles Angels-Boston Red Sox series are averaging $215. Average ticket prices for the first round of the baseball playoffs are up 115 percent this year, selling for an average of $115 last year.

Per game ticket price averages, including highs and lows, for each playoff game are as follows:

Game      Home Team (Opponent)               Avg      Low     High

Playoff     Chicago White Sox ( Minnesota )     $155     $70       $525

 

Gm. 1      LA Angels ( Boston )                       $151     $45       $951

Gm. 2      LA Angels ( Boston )                       $180     $55       $1,146

Gm. 3      Boston (LA Angels)                         $274     $112     $1,468

Gm. 4      Boston (LA Angels)                         $268     $123     $1,468

Gm. 5      LA Angels ( Boston )                       $205     $40       $1,230

 

Gm. 1      Philadelphia ( Milwaukee )               $228     $90       $671

Gm. 2      Philadelphia ( Milwaukee )               $240     $96       $669

Gm. 3      Milwaukee ( Philadelphia )               $306     $189     $1,118

Gm. 4      Milwaukee ( Philadelphia )               $258     $114     $1,118

Gm. 5      Philadelphia ( Milwaukee )               $302     $135     $895

 

Gm. 1      Chicago Cubs (LA Dodgers)            $391     $143     $2,796

Gm. 2      Chicago Cubs (LA Dodgers)            $447     $126     $3,075

Gm. 3      LA Dodgers ( Chicago Cubs)           $178     $73       $1,113

Gm. 4      LA Dodgers ( Chicago Cubs)           $153     $55       $1,399

Gm. 5      Chicago Cubs (LA Dodgers)            $665     $224     $3,355

 

Gm. 1      Tampa Bay (MIN or CWS)               $125     $54       $476

Gm. 2      Tampa Bay (MIN or CWS)               $125     $59       $554

Gm. 3      MIN or CWS ( Tampa Bay )             N/A       N/A       N/A

Gm. 4      MIN or CWS ( Tampa Bay )             N/A       N/A       N/A

Gm. 5      Tampa Bay (MIN or CWS)               $150     $68       $951

 Source: RazorGator


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
Tigers Set All-Time Attendance Record PDF Print E-mail
Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Thursday, 25 September 2008 14:01

TigersThe Tigers today established a new single-season attendance record by reaching 3,081,908 fans in their 78th game this season at Comerica Park. The attendance total surpasses the previous mark of 3,047,139, established last season.

"The Tigers would like to thank the fans for all of their support that has enabled the franchise to set attendance records in each of the past two seasons," said Tigers President, Chief Executive Officer and General Manager David Dombrowski. "Tigers fans have always been among the best in baseball."

In addition to the record-setting attendance numbers in each of the last two seasons, the Tigers have topped two million fans at Comerica Park in each of the last four seasons. The Tigers have topped one million fans in each of the past 44 seasons and stand as the only American League club to hold such a streak.

The following is a list of the top single-season attendance numbers in Detroit

 Rank Season Home Attendance
 Home Dates
Home Average
 1 2008 3,081,908 78 39,512
 2 2007 3,047,139 81 37,619
 3 1984 2,704,794 76 35,589
 4 2006 2,595,937 81 32,049
 5 2000 2,533,752 81 31,281

 Source: Detroit Tigers


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

Don't forget to register and log in on The Biz of Baseball site to get updates via your in-box, and see information only logged in members can see.

 
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