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Ticket & Attendance Watch
MLB Postseason Starts With Attendance Increase Over 2008 PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Thursday, 08 October 2009 12:07

MLB Postseason

The first three games of MLB’s 2009 postseason are in the books, and with it, sees an increase of 18,892 over the same number of games last season. The increase can be attributed to the Cubs being out of the mix this year – Wrigley Field’s small seating capacity.

In terms of seating capacity, two games were sellouts (Dodger Stadium, Citizens Bank Park). The Yankees, after missing the playoffs last season, made their postseason return this year in new Yankee Stadium filling it to 94.7 percent of capacity (based on regular season seating capacity).

Both the 2008 and 2009 postseasons started on a Weds., but this year, due to the World Baseball Classic shifting the regular season start, the postseason started one week later than 2008.

Below is a breakdown of Day 1 of the Division Series from last season to this:

Year

Date

Ballpark

Score

Game #

Series

Attendance

% of Capacity

2008

Oct 1

Citizens Bank Park

Brewers - 1
Phillies - 3

Game 1

NLDS 1

45,929

105.2

Oct 1

Wrigley Field

Dodgers - 7
Cubs - 2

Game 1

NLDS 2

42,099

102.3

Oct 1

Angel Stadium of Anaheim

Red Sox - 4
Angels - 1

Game 1

ALCS 1

44,996

99.4

 

Year

Date

Ballpark

Score

Game #

Series

Attendance

% of Capacity

2009

Oct 7

Citizens Bank Park

Rockies - 1
Phillies - 5

Game 1

NLDS 1

46,452

106.4

Oct 7

Yankee Stadium

Twins - 2
Yankees - 7

Game 1

ALCS 1

49,464

94.7

Oct 7

Dodger Stadium

Cardinals - 3
Dodgers - 5

Game 1

NLDS 2

56,000

100

 


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Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is available for hire or freelance. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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Record Attended Game at Metrodome Pushes MLB Attendance To 73,418,529 PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 06 October 2009 23:59
MLB Attendance - DETAILS
Select the image to view attendance for
each of the 30 clubs (PDF)

With Game 163 in the books – the final regular season game at the Metrodome, a record breaking 54,088 – the book can now be completely closed on MLB’s 2009 regular season attendance picture (the Metrodome’s story will continued to be told after beating the Tigers 6-5 for the AL Central title in thrilling fashion). Baseball completed the season with a total attendance of 73,418,529, down 6.58 percent from a total of 78,591,116 in 2008. The total attendance figure will rank as the fifth highest in MLB history. In another measure of attendance, ballparks saw an average of 30,338 over 2,420 games, down 6.77 percent from the 32,543 in average attendance over 2,415 games last season.

The AL Central tiebreaker game between the Tigers and Twins at the Metrodome was the largest attended game in the facilitiy's history. The extra 54,088 in attendance pushed the Twins from 15th to 14th overall in attendance for 2009.

Two franchises, the reigning World Series champion Philadelphia Phillies and the Boston Red Sox, set all-time club records, drawing 3,600,693 and 3,062,699, respectively. The Los Angeles Dodgers led the Major Leagues in attendance with 3,761,669 for an average of 46,440, an increase of .83 percent from last season. With the Dodgers garnering the highest level of attendance this year, it marks the first time since ’04 that the Yankees will have attendance below 4 million. The last time the Yankees ranked lower than first in total attendance was 2002 when the Seattle Mariners held the #1 position.

As detailed in our look at all 30 clubs on Monday, 22 of the 30 clubs ended the season with their average attendance lower than their 2008 figures.

(For a complete breakdown, see Inside The Numbers: Final 2009 MLB Regular Season Attendance)

Nine clubs drew more than three million fans (Dodgers, New York Yankees, Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Chicago Cubs, New York Mets, Red Sox and Milwaukee Brewers) and 10 clubs averaged more than 35,000 fans per game (the above clubs plus the San Francisco Giants). Last year, nine clubs drew more than three million, with two (the Yankees and Mets) drawing over 4 million.

When factoring in the smaller seating capacities of the new ballparks for the Yankees and Mets, along with not filling them completely, attendance is actually down 5.2 percent. The two New York franchises accounted for nearly 30 percent of the total decline in attendance this year.

See the master table from our “Inside” article showing 2008 compared to 2009 for each of the clubs.

The following details attendance (both total and average) over the last nine years"

 

MLB Total Attendance

Total Attendance 2001-09

YEAR

GAMES

TOTAL

% (+/-)

2001

2413

72,530,213

 

2002

2412

67,858,176

-6.44%

2003

2413

67,688,994

-0.25%

2004

2402

73,022,969

7.88%

2005

2419

74,925,821

2.61%

2006

2421

76,078,766

1.54%

2007

2425

79,503,175

4.50%

2008

2415

78,591,116

-1.15%

2009

2420

73,418,529

-6.58%

 

Average Attendance

Average Attendance 2001-09

YEAR

GAMES

TOTAL

% (+/-)

2001

2413

30,058

 

2002

2412

28,134

-6.40%

2003

2413

28,052

-0.29%

2004

2402

30,401

8.37%

2005

2419

30,974

1.88%

2006

2421

31,425

1.45%

2007

2425

32,785

4.33%

2008

2415

32,543

-0.74%

2009

2420

30,338

-6.77%

 

While we examined each club in detail on Monday (see the attached PDF for details on each of the 30 clubs attendance from 2001 to 2009), as an extra bonus, we provide the historical attendance over the last nine years, this time by Division.
Select Read More to see historical attendance from 2001-2009 by Division

Read more...
 
Yankees To Lower Prices As Much as $1,250 for Legend Suite Seats PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Monday, 05 October 2009 21:35
Empty seats at Yankee Stadium
The cost of luxury seats, coupled with the decline
in the economy meant a sea of empty seats in the
first year at new Yankee Stadium. Next season
some of those seats will be priced less.

In mid-September, word came that the Yankees were going to restructure the pricing for a sizeable portion of Yankee Stadium after Hal Steinbrenner was sensitive to the economy and to consumer response regarding the steep prices in the first year at new Yankee Stadium. This evening, Ronald Blum of The Associated Press released a report detailing the changes slated for next season, with some ticket prices cut as much as $1,250. As reported, the top-notch Legends Suite seats will see approx. 25 percent of them reclassified, leaving a total of 1,357 compared to 1,895 last season:

A total of 538 seats along the foul lines will be called the Champions Suite and will no longer have access to the duplex restaurant behind home plate, according to the team's 2010 premium seat plan.

Those seats cost $500-$1,000 this year as part of full season tickets, but will sell for $300-$500 next year. They still will have waiter service and access to lounges down each foul line with free food to take to the seats and soft drinks.

In addition, some seats in the Delta Sky 360 Suite section, which is in the 200 level, will see price cuts.

The changes come after the Yankees dropped prices part way through the 2009 season after seeing many of the most expensive seats empty, especially those behind home plate where they were easily seen during broadcasts of games.

Blum reports that, “Overall, the Yankees said last month that 41,928 of 50,086 seats will have the same season price as this year, and 6,454 will drop. The remainder, 1,704 non-premium seats, will increase from $100 to $125.”

Select Read More to see the original Legend Suite prices at the beginning of the season, the changes made mid-season, and the pricing restructure that will take place in 2010

Read more...
 
Inside The Numbers: Final 2009 MLB Regular Season Attendance PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Monday, 05 October 2009 12:28

MLB Attendance SeriesNOTE: With the AL Central tiebreaker game completed in Minnesota, data within the article has been updated to reflect the additional 54,088 for the Twins, as well as adustments to total and average attendance for the league. The extra record-setting sellout game for the Twins moved them from 15th to 14th overall in attendance this year.-- Maury Brown


With Major League Baseball feeling the full weight of the recession and decreasing seating capacity in two new ballparks, the 2009 regular season ended with 73,418,529 in total attendance a decline of 6.58 percent. In terms of average attendance, over the course of 2,420 games, MLB saw an average of 30,338 compared to an average of 32,543 over 2,415 games, a decline of 6.77 percent  The decline in attendance this year is the steepest since 1952, and yet, baseball will see the fifth highest attendance figure ever.

(See the tables and charts provided for MLB total and average attendance at the bottom. Select Read More to see details for each of the 30 clubs from this year to last)

Thirteen clubs drew above the league average of 30,328, compared to 17 below the average.

Twenty-two of the 30 clubs ended the season with their average attendance lower than their 2008 figures. Average attendance is calculated by taking the total attendance divided by actual games played, which can fluctuate from club to club depending on games that were not made up due to rain outs. In terms of total attendance – the total number of tickets sold, irrespective of the number of games played, 21 teams see decreases. The difference is based on the Rockies getting a full schedule of home games in 2009 compared to 80 games last season, thus seeing 2,665,080 in total attendance compared to 2,650,218 last season, an increase of .56 percent, while seeing a .68 percent decline in average attendance (32,902 for 2009 compared to 33,127 in 2008).

While Selig and Co. were fairly close in their projections of a 6 percent decline when the season began, considering the numbers are slightly better when noting that both the Yankees and Mets opened new ballparks with much lower seating capacities than their predecessors.

Last year saw the second highest attendance figure in MLB history, drawing 78,624,324, falling just 1.14 percent below 2007’s record of 79,502,524 in paid attendance. The Yankees opened their new $1.3 billion ballpark this year with a seating capacity of 52,325 compared to 57,545 at old Yankee Stadium, a decrease 5,220 seats. The Mets, who opened the new Citi Field this year, sees a seating of 42,000 compared to the gargantuan Shea Stadium that had a seating capacity of 57,333, a difference of 15,333. So, consider… If every game in both ballparks were to have been sold out, and the levels for the other 28 ballparks remained the same as last year, there still would have been a decline of just over 700,377 (4,238,325 for the Yankees, and 3,402,000 for the Mets), a decline of 1 percent. Based upon the seating capacity decreases, MLB seemed near certain to see a decline this year, even if the economy had not tanked.

MLB Attendance - DETAILS
Select the image to view attendance for
each of the 30 clubs (PDF)

In a sign that the Yankees and Mets may have priced themselves out of robust attendance figures in their respective stadiums, the Yankees saw their new ballpark filled to only 87.8 of capacity due to the smaller seating capacity, compared to 92.3 percent of capacity in the final year of The House That Ruth Built. This year only saw two sellouts, according to New Stadium Insider. The finally tally sees the Yankees with a total attendance of 3,719,358 (down 13.48 percent from 2008). In terms of percentage of capacity, it is the “lowest” since 2004 when old Yankee Stadium was filled to 83.1 percent of being completely full. The House That George Built saw an average attendance of 47,788 and total attendance of 3,775,292 in its inaugural season. It is also the first time since ’04 that the Yankees will have attendance below 4 million, being bumped from first to a second place in attendance ranking behind the Dodgers. The last time the Yankees ranked lower than first in total attendance was 2002 when the Mariners held the #1 position. The Mets, who many analysts felt may have sized themselves down in seating capacity too far due to demand, making each game a potential sellout, saw the season end with Citi Field being it filled to 92.7 percent of capacity, an amount tied to the economy but also a season that can only be described as highly disappointing (70-92, .432, 4th in the NL East). For 2009, the Mets drew 3,154,262 over 81 games, a decline of 21.96 percent from last year based on total attendance, or a decline of 23.89 percent, based on an average attendance of 38,942 compared to 51,165 in the last year at Shea Stadium.

All told, the two New York clubs account for nearly 30 percent of the total decline in attendance across the league.

The other major decliners include the Toronto Blue Jays (down 21.82 percent), Nationals (21.68 percent), and Padres (20.8 percent). There were also the Detroit Tigers who find themselves in a one game playoff against the Twins for the AL Central crown and a trip to the playoffs and yet found themselves with an average attendance decline nearly 20 percent (-19.84%). The reason is tied most directly to the local economy where the Big 3 automakers have seen the recession take a massive chunk out of the market’s disposable income.

But, not all decliners were tied most specifically the economy. The Nationals finished in the standings with a 59-103 record (.364), the worst record in the majors. The Nats drew 1,817,280 over 80 games, for an average of 22,716, a 21.68 decline over 2008, the first year in Nationals Park. It is the lowest attendance the Nationals have had since the Expos relocated to Washington, D.C. Another sobering stat is that Nationals Park was just barely filled half full over the course of the season. Based on paid attendance, not turnstile clicks at the gate that are normally lower, Nationals Park finished the year being filled to 54.2 percent of capacity. The Nationals front office brass didn’t seem to be making excuses on the declines.

"I think it's more dependent on won-loss record, but clearly the economics have a role to play," said Nationals president Stan Kasten to The Associated Press. "I'm a believer we get the attendance we deserve."

In terms of overall attendance slides over time, the Oakland Athletics have to be concerned. Not only do they see a decline of over 16 percent in total attendance (15.35 percent decline in average attendance), they have been dropping in attendance since 2004, seeing a fall of 43.68 percent when they drew 2,216,596 in 2003 to 1,392,192 ending this season. The A’s also have the dubious distinction of bumping the Marlins out of the “worst attendance” position where they had held it since 2006. The reason? Certainly their play on the field this year didn’t help (last in the AL West), but the protracted process of trying to find a new stadium has soured the waters in Oakland where the club has said it is unlikely that they will remain.

While there were few that had increases in attendance, there were some. With a newly renovated Kauffman Stadium, the Royals see the largest jump in attendance at 1,797,887 compared to 1,578,922 last season, an increase of 13.87 percent. The total attendance figure is the highest the Royals have had over the last 9 years of our study.

The other clubs to see attendance increases in the double-digits came by way of the Texas Rangers, who had an upbeat season on the field going 87-75 (.537), placing 2nd in the AL West. The Rangers had 2,156,016 in total attendance (27,641 avg.) an increase of 10.81 by total attendance and 13.66 percent by average attendance (the Rangers played 78 games at home compared to 80 last season). It was a glimmer of hope when considering that the increase still sees the attendance total down nearly 200,000 from the average attendance of 2,351,241 over the last 9 seasons. The other notable increase was by the Florida Marlins who flirted with a Wild Card berth (again) this year, while drawing 1,464,109, an increase of 9.66 by total attendance, and 12.48 percent by average attendance (18,770 over 78 games compared to 16,688 over 80 games last year). The increase coupled with Oakland’s decline means that the Marlins can now say they only have the 29th worst attendance in the league, as opposed to worst.

While there were 9 clubs that increased attendance, the news isn’t as good as it sounds. Of those that saw increases, three of them saw increases of less than 1 percent (Dodgers, Red Sox, Rockies).

While some may look at the figures and say that it’s a black eye for the league, Commissioner Selig sees the decline as a major achievement.

"Given that we are in the worst economic recession since the Great Depression," Selig said to USA Today, "it is stunning. This year is a great testament to the huge popularity of our sport."

Given than MLB had projection models that ranged from flat, to 10 percent, and 20 percent declines, the decline of just under 7 percent has to be seen as a victory for the league.

As a sidebar, the final games of the season (minus tiebreaker game of Tues.), shows that fans, for the most part, like to get their last taste of baseball before fall and winter set in; the last day of the season offers a boost for MLB attendance.  In both 2008 and 2009, the overall numbers were around 4,000 higher than the overall average. Three non-playoff teams drew significantly higher last day numbers:  Atlanta Braves (7,091 more) Tampa Bay Rays (5,621) and Seattle Mariners (5,223). Only one team’s fans sent a negative message, the Baltimore Orioles drew 5,645 less than average. The Oakland A’s, who had the lowest MLB attendance, finished last on the final day of the season drawing under 17,000.  The Minnesota Twins, fighting for a playoff spot, drew 51,155, second highest in the league and almost twice their season average. On the final day of 2008 and 2009, 60 percent of games outdrew the home team’s average for the season.  Despite the natural boost, the overall numbers followed suit with the drop in overall 2009 attendance, MLB drew around 15,000 less on the final day than the final day of 2008.

Will 2010 See a Change?

The chances that MLB will see attendance levels back to 2008’s levels in next year seem slim to none. The economy sees nothing more than a faint glimmer that this recession may be coming to an end, and clubs seem well aware of it. Many have already announced lower ticket prices, including the Mets and Yankees (see the Ticket / Attendance Watch section), baseball is preparing itself for 2010 while the ’09 postseason prepares to get underway. What will be interesting is to see how far league revenues dropped this year. The hope that revenues could be flat for the league seem a remote chance at this stage.

Other Points of Interest

  • With old Yankee Stadium and Shea Stadium now history, no team drew over 4 million in attendance this year, something done by the Yankees four times (2005-08), and once by the Mets (2008) over the last 9 years.
  • Two clubs drew over 100 percent of capacity in 2009: The Philles (102.2 percent) and the Red Sox (101.5 percent), compared to one last season (Red Sox at 104 percent)
  • Glass half empty: Three clubs ended their season with less than half their seats. Baltimore (48.9%), Toronto (45.9%), and Oakland (39.8%)
  • Down in a Hole: In 2001, the Indians ranked 4th in league attendance. This year, the club just missed having its lowest attendance in 9 years, posting 1,766,242 in total attendance, a decline of 18.6 percent from last year. Where do they rank now? 26th, compared to 22nd the past two seasons.
  • Nearly bullet proof? The Angels saw a 2.89 percent decline to 3,240,386 in attendance, but actually moved from 6th to 5th in the rankings. That should be seen as impressive given that in 2001, the club just barely pulled in 2 million in attendance and ranked 20th in the league.
  • Talk about symmetry... Average attendance for the season was down 6.8 percent. What was decline for interleague this year? 6.66 percent

 

MLB Total Attendance

Total Attendance 2001-09

YEAR

GAMES

TOTAL

% (+/-)

2001

2413

72,530,213

 

2002

2412

67,858,176

-6.44%

2003

2413

67,688,994

-0.25%

2004

2402

73,022,969

7.88%

2005

2419

74,925,821

2.61%

2006

2421

76,078,766

1.54%

2007

2425

79,503,175

4.50%

2008

2415

78,591,116

-1.15%

2009

2420

73,418,529

-6.58%

 

Average Attendance

Average Attendance 2001-09

YEAR

GAMES

TOTAL

% (+/-)

2001

2413

30,058

 

2002

2412

28,134

-6.40%

2003

2413

28,052

-0.29%

2004

2402

30,401

8.37%

2005

2419

30,974

1.88%

2006

2421

31,425

1.45%

2007

2425

32,785

4.33%

2008

2415

32,543

-0.74%

2009

2420

30,338

-6.77%

 

Select Read More to see attendance details for all 30 clubs during the 2009 MLB regular season

Read more...
 
Yankees Add Limited Number of Seats for Postseason PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Friday, 02 October 2009 14:24

YankeesSeeing a return to the playoffs after missing them last year, the New York Yankees have announced additional seating for the 2009 postseason.

There will be 60 café seats on the Field Level concourse available for $81 per ticket for the Division Series and $131 per ticket for the League Championship Series. Additionally, approximately 200 standing room tickets for dedicated standing locations on the Field and Main Levels will cost $33 and $25, respectively, for the ALDS and $64 and $48, respectively, for the ALCS. Fans are encouraged to visit yankees.com for complete postseason ticket information, including the refund procedure for any unplayed games. World Series ticket information will be made available at a later date.

Tickets for 2009 American League Division Series (ALDS) and American League Championship Series (ALCS) games at Yankee Stadium will go on sale to the public on Monday, October 5 at 10:00 a.m.

The Yankees note that ALDS and ALCS tickets will not be available for purchase at Yankees Clubhouse Shops or through Ticketmaster outlets or phone sales.


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Mets Lower Ticket Prices for 2010 PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Thursday, 01 October 2009 15:58

MetsThe New York Mets today announced across the board decreases in the price of Season Tickets for the 2010 season at Citi Field with no increase in the price of any ticket next year.

The average ticket price on a full-season basis will drop by more than 10 percent with reductions in select locations in excess of 20 percent. Every Season Ticket Holder will see a decrease in their invoice for next season.

The price of the least expensive seat will remain at $11.

"The Mets are sensitive to the economic realities facing our fans and we have lowered our ticket prices in response to these challenging conditions," said Dave Howard, Executive Vice President, Business Operations. "This move underscores our appreciation of our fans' ongoing loyalty and support. We are committed to delivering exceptional service and value to our customers at Citi Field in 2010."

Source: NY Mets


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Chicago Cubs Surpass 3 Million in Attendance for Sixth Season in a Row PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Thursday, 01 October 2009 11:51

CubsThe Chicago Cubs Wednesday reached three millions fans at Wrigley Field for the sixth season in a row and are one of only five major league franchises to surpass the mark every year starting in 2004.

"We thank our fans for their extraordinary support of this franchise as Wrigley Field welcomes its three millionth fan for the sixth season in a row," said Cubs Chairman Crane Kenney. "We also thank the city of Chicago for helping us welcome so many guests to Wrigley Field in 2009."

The Cubs are the only Chicago professional sports team to ever reach three million in attendance and are one of only five teams in Major League Baseball to have reached three million fans in each of the last six seasons, joining the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Yankees.

Through 77 home games, the club has played in front of 3,056,781 fans with four games still to play.

The Cubs rank 6th in the league in total attendance behind the Angels, Cardinals, Phillies, Dodgers, and Yankees.

The Cubs ranked 7th in total attendance last season, drawing 3,300,200, when they won the NL Central in a stronger economy.


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Nationals Lower Much of Their 2010 Ticket Prices PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Friday, 25 September 2009 16:58
Nationals 2010 Ticket Prices
Select the image provided to see the Nationals 2010
ticket prices (PDF)

The Washington Nationals released their 2010 season ticket prices that will see a decrease in prices on season tickets of over 3,300 seats, and no price increases in non-premium seats.

The club also announced that Nationals Season Ticket Holders who renew their plans will continue to receive many benefits that are not available to the individual ticket buyer, including the ability to enroll in the Grand Slam EZ Payment Plan.

“The Nationals are committed to providing a top-notch, affordable, fan experience for all guests,” said Nationals President Stan Kasten. “We are pleased to lower prices on over 3,300 seats, including over 2,000 in the lower bowl, and will continue to offer season ticket plans for as little as $10 per game. We thank our fans for their continued support of the Washington Nationals as we continue to build towards a winning ballclub in the Nation’s Capital.”

Not all prices will be lowered, including the most expensive seats at Nationals Park, the section directly behind homeplate named the Lexus Presidents Seats. The best seats at Nationals Park in this section will remain $300 per game, and are only available via full-season plans.

The team will introduce three new seating sections at the ballpark in 2010 – Home Plate Box, Home Plate Reserved and Outfield Reserved (see attached diagram). The Home Plate Box, adjacent to the Lexus Presidents seats, will cost $150 per seat and include one parking pass per four tickets and access to the PNC Diamond Club. The Home Plate Reserved, priced at $75 per ticket, is adjacent to the PNC Diamond seats. These two sections will provide guests with premier sightlines, just rows away from the action on the field. Additionally, the team has combined the LF Box (Sections 103 through 107), LF Reserved (101 and 102) and RF Reserved (138 through 143) to create the Outfield Reserved Section – in which over 2,000 seats have been reduced by at least $5. This section provides fans with additional options for affordable seats ($20 in a full season ticket plan) in the lower bowl of the ballpark, where they will find plenty to cheer about in 2010.

Additionally, over 1,000 seats in the Lower RF Terrace (the lower half of Sections 222 through 236) have been reduced to $15 per seat for all half- and partial-plan holders. (To see a complete list of season ticket prices, with changes in bold, select Read More). The club will also remove the remaining two rows of Red Loft Seats and replace them with bar rails, as seen throughout the ballpark. The changes to Nationals Park were made to add to the impressive sightlines and improve the experience of all Nationals fans visiting the ballpark.

The Nationals will offer half-season ticket plans in 2010 in areas of the ballpark where they were not available in 2008 or 2009. Fans may now purchase 42-game packages on the Club Level in 1st & 3rd Base Club (Sections 206 through 208 and 219 through 221, $50 per seat). Club Level seats include access to the Stars & Stripes Club.

The average season ticket price for a non-premium seat will be $28.60 at Nationals Park in 2010. Almost half (17,227) of the non-premium seats offered at Nationals Park will be $20 or less. According to the Nationals, “The total cost of a family of four attending a Washington Nationals game in 2010 could be as inexpensive as $40 for Season Ticket Holders on the Gallery Level or $80 on the Field Level.”

Select Read More to see the 2010 Nationals ticket pricing structure

Read more...
 
Astros To Lock In TIcket Prices for 2010, Offer Special Season Ticket Offer PDF Print E-mail
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Ticket & Attendance Watch
Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 16 September 2009 17:45

Houston AstrosThe Houston Astros announced today that there will be no increase in their season ticket pricing for the 2010 season. As a result, the Astros are offering all season ticket packages in public seating areas for the same prices as when fans purchased season tickets back in 2008. The announcement was made by Astros President of Business Opera­tions Pam Gardner.

“We value our fans and focus on customer service at Minute Maid Park,” Gardner said. “We have designed programs for 2010 that will help keep our great fans coming to our games with a variety of price options for everyone. We recognize the importance of offering affordable options, particularly in the current economic climate.”

The Astros are introducing a new “Buy Two, Get Two Free” season ticket offer for 2010. As part of this package, fans purchasing two season tickets in the entire View Deck I and View Deck II sections or in select Terrace Deck sections will receive an additional two season tickets of equal value in those sections for free. This offer is the first of its kind by a ma­jor professional sports franchise in the Houston market. With this option, full-season ticket plans begin as low as $415 per plan or $5 per ticket if purchased by the Early Bird discount price deadline of December 18, 2009.

On the lower level, Early Bird season ticket pricing is as follows: Dugout Boxes are $48 per game, Field Boxes $37, Craw­ford Boxes $32, and Bullpen Boxes $24. On the Second Level, Early Bird season prices are: Tier I Club Boxes are $50, Tier II Club Boxes $42 and Mezzanine $18.

The Astros are accepting deposits now for priority on 2010 full-season tickets and 27-game mini plan packages, all of which will go on sale beginning Monday, October 26th.

Season-ticket plans renewed or purchased before December 18 will allow fans to save up to 10% (depending on seat location) compared with purchasing after the Early Bird deadline. Purchasing before December 18 also allows season-ticket holders to save up to 21% on their purchase compared with buying tickets on an individual-game basis.

Each year, the Astros offer a wide variety of benefits to their full-season and 27-game mini plan holders. These benefits include pricing discounts on season tickets, preferred postseason pricing on Astros Division and League Championship Series tickets and special opportunities to purchase additional tickets to high-demand games.

New benefits for full-season ticket holders include invitations to exclusive watch parties at Minute Maid Park during an Astros Spring Training game and the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, an opportunity to run the bases at Minute Maid Park and an exclusive Astros 45th Anniversary season ticket holder polo shirt.

Another new opportunity for 2010 season ticket holders is the ability to donate unused tickets to help introduce under­priviliged children to the great game of baseball. Benefits for full-season ticket holders also include a 15% discount on merchandise in the Astros Team Store, early entry into Minute Maid Park to watch the Astros take batting practice on select dates and the opportunity to purchase tickets to non-baseball events at Minute Maid Park.

In addition to receiving discounted Early Bird pricing, fans renewing or purchasing full-season tickets by December 18, 2009 can also pick from one of three Minute Maid Park “Early Bird Experiences”, which include taking batting practice at home plate, playing catch in the outfield or taking an exclusive Astros Clubhouse Tour. Additionally, one lucky “Early Bird” season ticket holder will win an All-Inclusive Trip For Four to New York City to watch the Astros play the Yankees at the new Yankee Stadium.

Source: Houston Astros


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