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Selig Memo: MLB to Test Non-Players for Steroids, Drugs PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 28 February 2007 17:32

A newly released and obtained 5-page memo from Commissioner Selig, outlining the breadth and width of attempts to eradicate drug use in MLB—including steroids—all personnel—players (Major and Minor League), non-players (Major and Minor League), Umpires (MLB), executives (Club front office personnel, managers, coaches, trainers), and the Office of the Commissioner (all employees of the Office of the Commissioner, MLB Enterprises, MLB Properties, MLB International, MLB Productions, and MLB Advanced Media)—will fall under the testing program as the players now currently have: unannounced testing for banned substances, including steroids.

Subject to testing In the memo dated Feb. 21 entitled, “Major League Baseball’s Drug Policy and Prevention Program”, the aforementioned groups within MLB are all listed under the subsection: A) Who Is Subject to Testing. While MLB players on the 40 man roster, Minor League players on the 40 man roster, and Umpires are subject to random tests as part of the Joint Drug Agreement, the non-player personnel and executives do not have the “random” provision outlined.

Also, a bolded and italicized statement states the following:

If any Club attempts to conceal or fails to disclose to the Office of the Commissioner any information concerning drug use by a player or other Club personnel, that Club will be fined in an amount up to $2,000,000, the highest allowable amount under the Major League Constitution. This duty to disclose includes all positive test results pursuant to a Club-initiated and administered testing program.

FineWhile it is unclear in the memo the reasoning for the expanded testing to non-player personnel, speculation might suggest that the attempts by George Mitchell in his steroid investigation might be playing a part in this expanded and precedent-setting policy. Mitchell did say in his remarks from the Owners Meetings on January 18th, “I believe that a report that is not credible and thorough will significantly increase the possibility of action by others, especially if it’s the result of a lack of cooperation by the Clubs, or by anyone who is or has been involved with Baseball.”

In addressing confidentiality, it seems clear that while Baseball will look to protect offenders, they may find their names in the public eye.

The memo further states:

The confidentiality of Baseball personnel’s medical conditions and test results will be protected to the maximum extent possible and as required by law recognizing that individuals who violate Baseball’s prohibition on the use of illegal drugs or controlled substances may come to the attention of the public and media.

Select the images above to see excerpts from the memo, or read the entire memo here (PDF)

 
 
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