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Luxury Tax Totals
MLB Luxury Tax Totals PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 21 December 2010 21:24

2003-Present

The following is Competitive Balance Tax (CBT), or as it is more commonly known as Luxury Tax payments by club and year since the "soft cap" was put in place as part of the 2002 MLB Collective Bargaining Agreement to the present.

UPDATED 12/14/12

Year Yankees Red Sox Angels Tigers TOTAL
2012 $18,917,994       $18,917,994
2011 $13,896,069 $3,430,810

$17,326,879
2010 $18,029,654 $1,487,149

$19,516,803
2009 $25,689,173


$25,689,173
2008 $26,862,702

$1,305,220 $28,167,922
2007 $23,881,386 $6,064,287

$29,945,673
2006 $26,009,039 $497,549

$26,506,588
2005 $34,053,787 $4,148,981

$38,202,768
2004 $25,964,060 $3,148,962 $927,057   $30,040,079
2003 $11,798,357

  $11,798,357
TOTALS $225,102,221 $18,777,738 $927,057 $1,305,220 $246,112,236

Source: The Associated Press

MLB Luxury Tax Totals

1997-1999

The luxury tax from 1997 to 1999 was based on the average annual values of contracts of players on teams' 40-man rosters as adjusted each day of the regular season, and was assessed on the biggest spenders at a rate of 34 percent on the amount of salary above the midpoint of the teams with fifth- and sixth-highest payrolls.

The tax went out of existence following the season. Owners, unable to get a salary cap, agreed to the tax in the settlement of the 1994-95 strike, hoping it would slow the rate of payroll growth.

It succeeded only very slightly, allowing the high-revenue teams to raise their payrolls to nearly $100 million last season and allowing them to dominate postseason play.

Players insisted the luxury tax not be included in the final year of that labor contract (it was re-established under a different formula as part of the 2002-2006 CBA, and extended beyond).

Below are the numbers for the Competitive Balance Tax (CBT), otherwise known as the "Luxury Tax" for 1997-1999.

Club 1997 1998 1999 TOTALS
Dodgers
$49,593 $5,150,000 $5,199,593
Yankees $4,431,180 $684,390 $4,250,000 $9,365,570
Orioles $4,030,228 $3,138,621 $4,070,000 $11,238,849
Indians $2,065,496

$2,065,496
Braves $1,299,957 $495,625 $772,000 $2,567,582
Marlins $139,607

$139,607
Mets

$525,000 $525,000
Red Sox
$2,184,734
$2,184,734
TOTALS $11,966,468 $6,552,963 $14,767,000 $33,286,431

Source: The Associated Press

Luxury Tax (1997-1999)

All-Time Luxury Tax Payments

Based upon data aggregated by The Biz of Baseball across the two Competitive Balance Tax models, we provide the totals for all clubs hit with the tax, plus the percentage of the total that the club has paid.

Lifetime Luxury Tax Payments
Club Total % of Total
Yankees $225,102,221 84.04%
Red Sox $18,777,738 7.01%
Orioles $11,238,849 4.20%
Dodgers $5,199,593 1.94%
Braves $2,567,582 0.96%
Indians $2,065,496 0.77%
Tigers $1,305,220 0.49%
Angels $927,057 0.35%
Mets $525,000 0.20%
Marlins $139,607 0.05%
TOTAL $267,848,363 100%

Source: The Associated Press

Luxury Tax (All-Time)


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey, as well as a contributor to FanGraphs and Forbes SportsMoney. He is available for hire or freelance. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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