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Yankees Post $220 Million Player Payroll for End of 2009 Season PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Tuesday, 22 December 2009 05:14

MLBThe New York Yankees, once again, ended the year with highest player payroll in MLB posting $220,024,917 for their 40-man roster that won the 2009 World Series. The high player payroll figure means that for the seventh consecutive year, the Yankees will pay into the Luxury Tax (see Yankees Hit With Luxury Tax Bill of Nearly $26 Million for8  2009), but was 1.12 percent lower than their 2008 end-of-year figure. The payroll figure for the Yankees eclipsed the second highest figure by their cross-town National League neighbors the New York Mets, who had an end of year player payroll figure of $142,229,759. The difference between the Yankees and Mets of $77,795,158 was higher than 11 of the clubs in the league spent at the end of the 2009 season.

In a sign that the economy was in play, the 30 clubs spent $2,913,904,332 on player payroll, an increase of just 1.19 percent from the $2,879,357,538 spent on player payroll at the end of the 2008 season.

Based upon reports, the total amount spent on player payroll accounts for 52 percent of the $6.5 billion in revenues the league pulled in this year.

Big gainers from 2008 to 2009 included the Rays ($71,222,532, up 39.60 percent), Marlins ($37,532,482, up 38.99 percent) and  2008 World Series Champion Phillies ($138,286,499, up 22.75 percent)

On decliners, the divorce of Moores greatly impacted matters with the San Diego Padres. The club posted an end of year payroll of $43,210,258, down 39.32 percent from $71,212,182 figure at the end of the 2008 season. Other double-digit decliners included the Mariners ($102,343,617, down 15.04 percent), Blue Jays ($84,130,513, down 14.45 percent), and Reds ($72,693,206, down 12.3 percent). In terms of the Mariners, the shedding of payroll is key to their flexibility this off-season.

Sixteen of the 30 clubs had end of year player payroll increases over the year prior.

Select Read More to see complete end of year salary details for each of the 30 clubs in MLB, including last year’s figures, and the percentage of increase or decrease

2009 End of Year MLB Player Payroll
Team 2009 % (+/-) 2008
Yankees $220,024,917 -1.12% $222,519,480
Mets $142,229,759 -1.70% $144,693,962
Cubs $141,632,703 8.52% $130,508,691
Red Sox $140,454,683 -4.50% $147,075,645
Tigers $139,429,408 2.37% $136,198,404
Phillies $138,286,499 22.75% $112,654,711
Dodgers $131,507,197 4.48% $125,864,496
Angels $121,947,524 -4.83% $128,142,467
Astros $108,059,086 7.85% $100,189,948
White Sox $105,287,384 -7.35% $113,641,026
Cardinals $102,678,475 -6.65% $109,989,046
Mariners $102,343,617 -15.04% $120,456,113
Braves $100,078,591 8.20% $92,494,314
Giants $95,202,185 15.99% $82,074,873
Brewers $90,006,172 -0.35% $90,324,347
Rockies $84,450,797 12.91% $74,791,621
Blue Jays $84,130,513 -14.45% $98,343,520
Royals $81,917,563 18.21% $69,297,547
Orioles $79,308,066 0.53% $78,888,250
Rangers $77,208,810 -1.82% $78,640,138
Indians $77,192,253 -1.87% $78,663,582
D-Backs $73,800,852 -8.89% $80,998,526
Twins $73,068,407 12.25% $65,096,667
Reds $72,693,206 -12.30% $82,886,440
Rays $71,222,532 39.60% $51,020,720
Nationals $69,321,137 16.12% $59,699,668
Athletics $61,688,124 11.71% $55,223,294
Pirates $47,991,132 -5.46% $50,764,410
Padres $43,210,258 -39.32% $71,212,182
Marlins $37,532,482 38.99% $27,003,450

Source: The Associated Press

Final 2009 payrolls for the 30 major league teams, according to information received by clubs from the commissioner's office. Figures are for 40-man rosters and include salaries and pro-rated shares of signing bonuses, earned incentive bonuses, non-cash compensation, buyouts of unexercised options and cash transactions. In some cases, parts of salaries that are deferred are discounted to reflect present-day values.


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is available for hire or freelance. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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