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The Biz of Baseball mentioned in extensive NY Times article PDF Print E-mail
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Written by The Staff   
Saturday, 21 October 2006 17:19

The Biz of BaseballKen Belson has an extensive article on stadium economics within the Money section of the 10/22/06 (Sunday) edition of the New York Times.

The article, entitled Oh Yeah, There's a Ballgame, Too, goes into numerous facets of stadium economics including concessions, suites, and many other topics. A great deal of the article covers the development and marketing within Turner Field and Coors Field. The article also has a nice graphic breaking down the 2006 Fan Cost Index as published by Team Marketing Report.

The article also interviews Maury Brown, the editor of The Biz of Baseball. As reported:

An increase of one-tenth of a cent in the metro-area sales tax helped the local stadium authority repay the 20-year construction bonds for Coors in less than a decade. But revitalizing neighborhoods by building stadiums may be more difficult in New York, where the Yankees and Mets have broken ground on new fields next door to their existing stadiums. The Mets’ park in Queens is surrounded by highways and auto body shops, hardly an ideal magnet for upscale restaurants and boutique hotels. Parks border parts of Yankee Stadium, and fans have a myriad of dining and entertainment options elsewhere in the city.

Many civic leaders and taxpayers have also balked at how much money municipalities are being asked to pay for stadium projects, whether in the form of street improvements, parking lots, tax abatements or dozens of other subsidies. Relatively new parks in places like Milwaukee remain burdens on their cities, said Maury Brown, a writer for Baseball Prospectus, a publication devoted to analyzing the game. Local leaders in Oakland, Miami and Washington are keeping this in mind as they consider stadium upgrades in their cities.

“It’s reasonable to tax people who go to the ballparks through ticket taxes, but the general taxpayer should not bear the brunt of it,” said Mr. Brown, who is also editor of www.bizofbaseball.com. “There are a lot of hidden costs that get purposely buried. A lot of municipalities are pushing back.”

(The NY Times)

 
 
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