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Prince Fielder Completes 2-Year, $18.025M Deal with Brewers PDF Print E-mail
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Free Agency, Trades, and Signings
Written by Maury Brown   
Saturday, 24 January 2009 00:42

Prince Fielder

Prince Fielder struck gold on
Friday when he and the Brewers
completed a 2-year, $18.025M
deal loaded with incentives.

Prince Fielder will be making a whole lot more money the next two seasons than he did last year after his two-year, $18.025 million deal with the Milwaukee Brewers was completed Friday.

The deal came against the backdrop of comments last season by Fielder regarding his contact status.

"I'm not happy about it at all, the fact that they've renewed me two years in a row now," Fielder said last year at the time of his one-year renewal. "There are a lot of guys with the same amount of time I have who have done a lot less than me and are getting paid a lot more. But my time is going to come and it's coming quick, too."

He will make $6.5 million this season and $10.5 million in 2010. Fielder made $670,000 last season

The deal also gives Fielder a $1 million signing bonus, and other incentives, including $250,000 for 500 plate-appearances. He can earn an additional $100,000 if he wins the MVP, $75,000 for second and $50,000 for third. He will make $50,000 if he makes the All-Star team, or $25,000 for being selected as an All-Star. He can earn $25,000 for being the LCS MVP, $10,000 for World Series MVP, $50,000 for winning a Gold Glove, and $50,000 for winning a Silver Slugger award.

With the signing bonus, and adjusting for the MLBPA's accounting, Fielder will  see an extra $25,000 because the bonus is being received in advance. All told, Fielder's contract is worth $18.025 million.

Fielder’s 2008 rankings were 20th (NL) and 32nd (MLB) in SLG by hitting .507, 8th (NL) and 11th (MLB) with 34 HRs, 11th (NL) and 23rd (MLB) in RBIs with 102, 13th (NL) and 19th (MLB) in SOs with 134, and 16 (NL) and 30th (MLB) in OPS.

The signing of Fielder clears the second biggest salary arbitration player off of the roster of 46 that exchanged figures this year. Only the Phillies Ryan Howard has a larger salary figures in play with the Phillies offering $14 million and Howard asking for $18 million.

The deal avoided arbitration with the Brewers who were offering $6 million while Fielder’s arbitration figure was $8 million. In inking the deal, his 2009 salary will be $500,000 under the mid-point of $7 million between the two figures.

At the very least, Fielderwill see the second biggest raise of all the players in this year’s class. His raise from his 2008 salary to his 2009 salary is $5.83 million. If Ryan Howard and the Phillies were to agree on the mid-point of $16 million, his raise would be $6 million over last season. If were to go all the way to salary arbitration hearing with the Brewers, as he did last year, and win, he would see a raise of $8 million.

The signing of Fielder leaves two players in salary arbitration for the Brewers. Reliever Seth McClung signed a1-year, $1.6625 million deal before salary figures were exchanged.

Outfielder Cory Hart and second baseman Rickie Weeks are the last two Brewers remaining in salary arbitration. Hart is asking for $3.8 million while the Brewers are offering $2.7 million. He made $444,000 in 2008. Weeks is asking for $2.8 million while the Brewers are offering $2 million. He pulled in $1.056 million last season.

If history holds true, and agreements are reached with these players before hearing, they would most likely see contracts with 2009 salaries just below the mid-point. Hart would then make somewhere around $3.2 million and Weeks $2.35 million this season.

See Salary Arbitration Tracker for updated details

See Salary Arbitration Figures Tracker for exchanged figures between club and player 

MORE ON SALARY ARBITRATION


Maury BrownMaury Brown is the Founder and President of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football, The Biz of Basketball and The Biz of Hockey. He is contributor to Baseball Prospectus, and is available as a freelance writer. Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

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