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Scorecard: Tracking the Impact of the Mitchell Report PDF Print E-mail
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Mitchell Report
Written by Maury Brown   
Monday, 17 December 2007 11:09

The flowing is a list of actions and activities in response to the Mitchell Report. Please check the "Updated" timestamp to see when this document was last updated.

This document can be accessed from the Mitchell Report section of The Biz of Baseball at any time in the future by selecting:

BoB Documents > PEDs > Mitchell Report from our navigation tier to the left of the site:

UPDATED: 12/18/07 (2:30pm ET)

Admitted Use of PEDs After Report's Release

  Date
 Player
What the report states:
Player Response:  Story Link
 
 12/17/08
  • Paul Byrd
(Pgs. 245-246) On October 21, 2007, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Cleveland Indians pitcher Paul Byrd had bought nearly $25,000 worth of human growth hormone and syringes from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center, one of the anti-aging clinics implicated in the Signature Pharmacy investigation, in thirteen transactions between August 2002 and January 2005. According to the story, Byrd used his credit card to purchase the substance and received more than 1,000 vials of human growth hormone in the transactions, which were sent to his home in Georgia, to the spring training facility of the Atlanta Braves, where he was playing at the time, and in one instance to a New York hotel.

In public comments in response to the article, Byrd admitted that he had been taking human growth hormone but said that he had been using it to treat a tumor on his pituitary gland. Byrd reportedly said that he had never taken “any hormone or drug that was not prescribed” to him by a doctor.The Chronicle reported that two of Byrd’s prescriptions had been written by a Florida dentist whose license was suspended in 2003.
Byrd met with baseball officials Monday (12/17/07) to discuss his use of human growth hormone.

It's uncertain whether Byrd will face any discipline from the commissioner's office or when a potential punishment might be handed down.

Among those at the meeting were Rob Manfred, baseball's executive vice president for labor relations, and Michael Weiner, general counsel for the players' association.
 12/17/07
  • Brian Roberts
(Pg. 158) According to [Larry] Bigbie, however, in 2004 Roberts admitted to him that he had injected himself once or twice with steroids in 2003. Until this admission, Bigbie had never suspected Roberts of using steroids.

In order to provide Roberts with information about these allegations and to give him an opportunity to respond, I asked him to meet with me; he declined.

"I would like to address the allegations that were made against me in the Mitchell Report. I will begin by saying that I have worked very hard to develop a good reputation both on and off the field. I have always taken pride in being a man of integrity and values. I know that by being a professional athlete, I am held to a very high standard. I never have and never will take that for granted. However, I am also human and I have made mistakes.

"In 2003, when I took one shot of steroids, I immediately realized that this was not what I stood for or anything that I wanted to continue doing. I never used steroids, human growth hormone or any other performance-
enhancing drugs prior to or since that single incident. I can honestly say before God, myself, my family and all of my fans that steroids or any performance-
enhancing drugs have never had any effect on what I have worked so hard to accomplish in the game of baseball. I am very sorry and I deeply regret ever making that terrible decision. My only hope and prayer is that the Orioles, my family, friends and fans that have supported me so faithfully will forgive me."

 12/17/07
  • Fernando Vina 
(Pgs. 213-214) While [Kirk] Radomski was working for the Mets as a clubhouse attendant in 1993, he
met Vina, who was then in the Mets minor league system. Radomski stated that he sold anabolic
steroids or human growth hormone to Vina six to eight times during 2000 to 2005. Radomski produced three checks from Vina. Radomski stated that these checks reflected a March 2003 purchase by Vina of human growth hormone, an April 2003 purchase by Vina of steroids, most likely Winstrol, and a July 2005 purchase by Vina of Deca-Durabolin.
"I never bought steroids from him. All I used was HGH," Vina said in an interview on ESPN... "I tried everything rehabbing," Vina said. "I came to a point that I was desperate." ... "Was it right? No. Obviously, it was wrong," Vina said. "I'm embarrassed by it."
 12/15/07
  • Gary Bennett, Jr.
(Pg. 222) Kirk Radomski said that Denny Neagle referred Bennett to him. Neagle and Bennett were teammates in 2001 and 2002 with the Colorado Rockies. Radomski recalled one transaction with Bennett in July 2003 for two kits of human growth hormone. Radomski produced one check from Bennett payable to Kirk Radomski in the amount of $3,200 dated July 13, 2003.

"Obviously, it was a stupid decision," Bennett said. "It was a mistake. It was some-
thing that quite obviously, you regret now."

12/15/07
  • Andy Pettitte
(Pg. 176) [In 2002] [Brian] McNamee traveled to Tampa at Pettitte’s request and spent about ten days assisting Pettitte with his rehabilitation. McNamee recalled that he injected Pettitte with human growth hormone that McNamee obtained from Radomski on two to four occasions. Pettitte paid McNamee for the trip and his expenses; there was no separate payment for the human growth hormone.
In 2002 I was injured. I had heard that human growth hormone could promote faster healing for my elbow. I felt an obligation to get back to my team as soon as possible. For this reason, and only this reason, for two days I tried human growth hormone. Though it was not against baseball rules, I was not comfortable with what I was doing, so I stopped. This is it -- two days out of my life; two days out of my entire career, when I was injured and on the disabled list.
 12/15/07
  • F.P.
    Santangelo
(Pgs. 182-183) [Kirk] Radomski believed that Santangelo was referred to him by David Segui when both played for the Expos between 1995 and 1997. Radomski produced one check from Santangelo dated October 23, 2000 in the amount of $1,400, which Radomski said was payment for a kit of human growth hormone. Radomski also recalled selling Deca-Durabolin and testosterone to Santangelo once or twice during 2001 when Santangelo was with the Oakland Athletics.
"I admitted it and I faced the music. And if by me being embarrassed helps generations to come not have to make the difficult decisions that I had to make, then it's good that this all came out. But I don't want to be Mr. Public Speaker and go talk to every high school in the world. Through my radio show, I just hope to get the word out about how bad this stuff is."

Denies Use of PEDs After Report's Release

  Date 
  Player
What the report states:
 Player Response:Story Link
 12/18/07
  • Roger Clemens
(Pg. 169) Toward the end of the [1998] road trip which included the Marlins series, or shortly after the Blue Jays returned home to Toronto, Clemens approached [Brian] McNamee and, for the first time, brought up the subject of using steroids. Clemens said that he was not able to inject himself, and he asked for McNamee’s help.

Later that summer, Clemens asked McNamee to inject him with Winstrol, which Clemens supplied. McNamee knew the substance was Winstrol because the vials Clemens gave him were so labeled. McNamee injected Clemens approximately four times in the buttocks over a several-week period with needles that Clemens provided. Each incident took place in Clemens’s apartment at the SkyDome. McNamee never asked Clemens where he obtained the steroids.

"I want to state clearly and without qualification: I did not take steroids, human growth hormone or any other banned substances at any time in my baseball career or, in fact, my entire life," Clemens said Tuesday in a statement issued through his agent, Randy Hendricks. "Those substances represent a dangerous and destructive shortcut that no athlete should ever take.

"I am disappointed that my 25 years in public life have apparently not earned me the benefit of the doubt, but I understand that Senator Mitchell's report has raised many serious questions. I plan to publicly answer all of those questions at the appropriate time in the appropriate way. I only ask that in the meantime people not rush to judgment."

Clemens fires back, denies taking steroids or HGH
 12/17/07
  • Brendan Donnelly
(Pg. 224) Radomski said that Donnelly was referred to him by Adam Riggs. Both Riggs and Donnelly played for the Angels in 2003 and 2004. Radomski recalled that Donnelly called him in 2004 looking for Anavar, an anabolic steroid. Radomski made one sale to Donnelly of Deca-Durabolin for which Donnelly paid $250 to $300.
"Upon learning that Anavar was classified as a steroid, I realized that was not an option," Donnelly said. "That was the end of it. Yes, I called him. But I did not purchase or receive anything from him. I never took Deca or Anavar. I do want to fully support the testing program of Major League Baseball, and I support wider testing."
12/15/07
  • Alex Cabrera
(Pg. 94) Sometime in mid-September  2000, a clubhouse employee with the Arizona Diamondbacks discovered a bottle of anabolic steroids and several hundred pills in a package that had been mailed to the Diamondbacks’ ballpark in Phoenix. Clubhouse attendants knew that the package had been intended for Alex Cabrera, then a player on Arizona’s major league roster, who had been searching for the package for several days. They gave the box to the team’s athletic trainer and told Cabrera that the package probably had been lost.
"I couldn't have used the substances that are identified," Cabrera said. "I never had possession of the alleged box that supposedly contained the pharmaceutical drugs."
12/14/07
  • David Justice
(Pg. 181) [Kirk] Radomski said he made one sale to Justice, which occurred after the 2000 World Series. Justice played for the Yankees that year. Justice paid Radomski by check for two or three kits of human growth hormone. Radomski said that he cashed this check. Brian McNamee recalled that Justice asked him about human growth hormone in 2000 or 2001, while McNamee and Justice were both with the Yankees. According to McNamee, Justice admitted in this conversation that he had obtained human growth hormone from Radomski.
"I've never seen Roger do anything nor have I ever had a conversation with him [about steroids]," Justice, appearing as a guest on the "The Herd" on ESPN Radio, said Friday. "He should be doing what I'm doing. He should be talking about it. If you really didn't do it, say something about it. At least have a conversation about it."

Other Public Responses After Report's Release

 Date Player Player Response:Story Link
 12/16/07
  • Alex Rodriguez

(From 60 Minutes interview)

Rodriguez answered "No" when asked whether he's ever used steroids, human growth hormone or any other performance-enhancing substance.

"I've never felt overmatched on the baseball field," he said. "... I felt that if I did my, my work as I've done since I was, you know, a rookie back in Seattle, I didn't have a problem competing at any level."

 

 12/15/07
  • Jason Varitek

(Regarding being on false "leaked list" of supposed names within the Mitchell Reports that was published on WNBC.com)

“I’d like to know where it came from, no question,” Varitek said yesterday by phone when asked if he was aware of the false report. “From what I know now, I guess (bad information) had been passed around all morning. More than anything, you’re just concerned about how something like that could happen.”

 12/14/07
  • Johnny Damon

(Regarding being on false "leaked list" of supposed names within the Mitchell Reports that was published on WNBC.com)

"It sucks, I am wondering if there is any legal course to turn to," Damon said. "I walk around with my shirt off. If I had anything to hide I wouldn't do that. I really don't know what to say. There seems to be some people who don't like me...

"I asked my agent about legal action, but he said it wasn't worth it. Maybe the president [of NBC] will write me a nice letter."

 

 12/13/07
  • Albert Pujols

(Regarding being on false "leaked list" of supposed names within the Mitchell Reports that was published on WNBC.com)

"It has come to my attention that several national and local news outlets have published false reports that associated my name with the Mitchell Report. I have never disrespected, nor cheated the game of baseball and knew without a doubt that my name would not be mentioned in the official investigation. I would like to express how upset and disappointed I am over the reckless reporting that took place this morning. It has caused me and my family a lot of senseless aggravation due to their inaccurate information."

 Research by Maury Brown  - From various sources.


Maury Brown

Maury Brown is the founder and president of the Business of Sports Network, which includes The Biz of Baseball, The Biz of Football and The Biz of Basketball (The Biz of Hockey will be launching shortly). He is also an author for Baseball Prospectus, Basketball Prospectus and is an available writer for other media outlets.

Brown's full bio is here. He looks forward to your comments via email and can be contacted through the Business of Sports Network.

 
 
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