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Angels Get 2010 All-Star Game. See Facts and Figures PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Maury Brown   
Wednesday, 28 May 2008 20:56

AngelsAs has been reported for nearly a week, MLB announced that the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim will host the 2010 All-Star Game from Angel Stadium. The game will mark the Angels 50th season in the league, and the 45th season in Angels Stadium.

Here are some other facts regarding the Angels and the All-Star Game

• The 2010 All-Star Game will be the 81st Midsummer Classic.

• It will mark the third time that the Angels have hosted the All-Star Games, having also welcomed the Midsummer Classic in 1967 and 1989.

• The 1967 All-Star Game was played on July 11th, with the National League winning the 15-inning, 2-1 contest, the longest Midsummer Classic (in both innings and time) in history. All three of the runs scored in the game came via solo homers. Philadelphia’s Dick Allen hit a long ball off A.L. starting pitcher Dean Chance in the second inning. Baltimore’s Brooks Robinson tied it up in the sixth inning with a blast against Fergie Jenkins. The game would remain scoreless until the 15th, when Cincinnati’s Tony Perez put the N.L. on top with a one-out homer – and ultimately earned himself All-Star Game Most Valuable Player honors – against Catfish Hunter, who was in his fifth inning of relief work. Tom Seaver pitched a scoreless bottom of the 15th to secure the win for Don Drysdale.

The 38th All-Star Game - July 11, 1967

NL
 010 000 000 000 001  9
AL 000 001 000
000
000
 


NL - Marichal, Jenkins (4), Gibson (7), Short (9), Cuellar (11), Drysdale (13), Seaver (15).
AL - Chance, McGlothlin (4), Peters (6), Downing (9), Hunter (11).
W - Drysdale. L – Hunter.
HR - Allen, Robinson, Perez.
Att. - 46,309.
TOG - 3:41

.• The 1989 Midsummer Classic also was held on July 11th, with the host American Leaguers earning a 5-3 victory. The 1989 All-Star Game, which featured former President Ronald Reagan in the crowd, was the first in history to feature use of the designated hitter. In the first inning, the National League used three singles, two walks and a double-steal to jump out to a 2-0 lead against American League starter Dave Stewart. With two outs and two men in scoring position, Kansas City sensation Bo Jackson made a spectacular running grab in left field, robbing Pedro Guerrero of a hit. In the bottom of the frame, Jackson led off with a towering center field home run, estimated at 448 feet, against N.L. starter Rick Reuschel, and Boston’s Wade Boggs followed with another blast to tie the score at 2-2. The A.L. tack on another run in the second, courtesy of Jackson’s RBI single, and four singles in the third inning plated two more runs. The two-sport star Jackson, the 1985 Heisman Trophy winner and a star tailback for the Los Angeles Raiders, finished with a 2-for-4 day at the plate and a stolen base. Before Jackson’s Most Valuable Player performance, Willie Mays had been the only player ever to homer and steal a base in an All-Star Game.

The 60th All-Star Game - July 11, 1989

NL
 200 000 010   0
AL 212 000 00x  12 0

NL - Reuschel, Smoltz (2), Sutcliffe (3), Burke (4), M. Davis (6), Howell (7), Williams (8).
AL - Stewart, Ryan (2), Gubicza (4), Moore (5), Swindell (6), Russell (7), Plesac (8), Jones (8).
W - Ryan. L – Smoltz.
HR - B. Jackson, Boggs.
Att. - 64,036
TOG - 2:48

• The 2008 All-Star Game will be held on July 15th at Yankee Stadium during its final season. The 2009 Midsummer Classic will be held at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

• The Angels have had three All-Star Game Most Valuable Players, and all three captured the honors in Chicago.

o Leon Wagner (3-for-4, 2 RBI) was the MVP of the second All-Star Game of the 1962 season at Wrigley Field in Chicago.
o Fred Lynn, the MVP of the 1983 All-Star Game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, hit perhaps the most famous home run in All-Star Game history. His third inning grand slam – the first in All-Star Game history – sent the American League on its way to a 13-3 victory, which broke the National League’s 11-year reign over the Midsummer Classic.
o In the first All-Star Game that featured the link to home-field advantage in the World Series, MVP Garret Anderson’s 3-for-4 day at the plate, which included a homer and a double, helped propel the A.L. to a dramatic, come-from-behind 7-6 win. Anderson had won the Home Run Derby the previous day.

• The Angels have had four pitchers who have been the American League’s starting hurler in the All-Star Game: Ken McBride (1963), Dean Chance (1964), Nolan Ryan (1979) and Mark Langston (1993).

Select Read More to see a complete listing of every Angel player, manager, trainer, or coach to ever selected to an All-Star Game 

Angels’ All-Star Selections

1961 — Ryne Duren, first game; Ken McBride, both games.
1962 — Leon Wagner*, Billy Moran*, Lee Thomas, both games; Bill Rigney (coach), Ken McBride, second game.
1963 — Ken McBride*, Leon Wagner*, Albie Pearson*.
1964 — Dean Chance*, Jim Fregosi*
1965 — Bob Lee.
1966 — Bobby Knoop*, Jim Fregosi.
1967 — Jim McGlothlin, Don Mincher, Jim Fregosi, Bill Rigney (coach).
1968 — Jim Fregosi*.
1969 — Jim Fregosi.
1970 — Sandy Alomar, Jim Fregosi, Alex Johnson, Clyde Wright, Lefty Phillips (coach).
1971 — Andy Messersmith.
1972 — Nolan Ryan.
1973 — Nolan Ryan, Bill Singer.
1974 — Dave Chalk, Frank Robinson, Dick Williams (manager), Whitey Herzog (coach), Freddie Frederico (trainer).
1975 — Dave Chalk, Nolan Ryan.
1976 — Frank Tanana.
1977 — Frank Tanana (replaced Dave LaRoche, who replaced Nolan Ryan).
1978 — Frank Tanana.
1979 — Rod Carew, Bobby Grich, Brian Downing, Don Baylor*, Nolan Ryan*, Mark Clear.
1980 — Rod Carew*, Bobby Grich, Bob Clear (coach).
1981 — Rod Carew*, Fred Lynn, Rick Burleson, Ken Forsch, Jimmie Reese (coach).
1982 — Rod Carew*, Reggie Jackson*, Fred Lynn*, Bobby Grich*.
1983 — Rod Carew*, Reggie Jackson*, Fred Lynn*, Doug DeCinces, Bob Boone.
1984 — Rod Carew*, Reggie Jackson*, Rick Smith (trainer).
1985 — Donnie Moore.
1986 — Wally Joyner*, Mike Witt.
1987 — Mike Witt.
1988 — Johnny Ray.
1989 — Chuck Finley, Devon White, Doug Rader (coach), Marcel Lachemann (coach), Rick Smith (trainer).
1990 — Chuck Finley, Lance Parrish.
1991 — Bryan Harvey, Mark Langston.
1992 — Mark Langston, Jimmie Reese (honorary captain), Rick Turner (bullpen catcher), Ned Bergert (trainer).
1993 — Mark Langston*.
1994 — Chili Davis.
1995 — Gary DiSarcina, Jim Edmonds, Chuck Finley, Lee Smith.
1996 — Chuck Finley, Troy Percival.
1997 — Jason Dickson, Rick Smith (trainer).
1998 — Darin Erstad, Troy Percival.
1999 — Troy Percival.
2000 — Darin Erstad, Troy Glaus.
2001 — Troy Glaus, Troy Percival.
2002 — Garret Anderson, Mike Scioscia (coach), Ned Bergert (trainer).
2003 — Garret Anderson*, Troy Glaus*, Brendan Donnelly, Mike Scioscia (manager), Joe Maddon (coach), Buddy Black (coach), Mickey Hatcher (coach), Ron Roenicke (coach), Alfredo Griffin (coach), Orlando Mercado (coach).
2004 — Vladimir Guerrero*, Francisco Rodriguez, Ned Bergert (trainer).
2005 — Garret Anderson, Bartolo Colon, Vladimir Guerrero*.
2006 — Vladimir Guerrero*.
2007 — Vladimir Guerrero*, Francisco Rodriguez, John Lackey.

* — Started game.

Source: MLB, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

 
 
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